The woodlands bloom in spring, too.

Anemones

Anemones

There are many spring “weeds” that thrive in the first rays of the returning sun, but in the woods plants are blooming as well.  Many are tiny, delicate and short-lived flowers (like wood anemones) that are often overlooked.  Others have been hybridized and cultivated from their wild cousins to join the garden (like lenten rose), and still others are invasives that have escaped from the garden trade to displace native life (like Oregon Grape).

The woods right now are more alive than you’d think, particularly in moist bottomlands.  If you have a chance, get out for a slow stroll or vigorous hike — whichever suits your style — and enjoy these treats while they last.

Lenten Rose (Helleborus orientalis)

Lenten Rose (Helleborus orientalis)

Hepatica sp.

Hepatica sp.

Bear's Foot (Helleborus foetidus) - non-native

Bear’s Foot (Helleborus foetidus) – non-native

Golden Ragwort (Packera aurea)

Golden Ragwort (Packera aurea)

Oregon Grape (Mahonia sp.)

Oregon Grape (Mahonia sp.)

Winter Honeysuckle (Lonicera sp.)

Winter Honeysuckle (Lonicera sp.)

 

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